An Interview With Tracy Thresher of Wretches and Jabberers

Wretches and Jabberers, the not-to-be-missed documentary by Oscar Award winning and two-time Academy award-nominated filmmaker Gerardine Wurtzburg, follows two non-speaking Autistic men, Tracy Thresher and Larry Bissonnette as they travel the world, reaching out to other non-speaking Autistic people in an attempt to change public perceptions surrounding intelligence and autism.

I’ve written about the film ‘here‘, ‘here‘ and ‘here‘ and about meeting Tracy and Larry, ‘here‘, ‘here‘ and ‘here‘.  I cannot emphasize enough how mind altering this documentary is. It is imperative people begin to examine their own ideas about what intelligence is and what that means, particularly as parents of children who may be similar to Larry and Tracy, who appear profoundly disabled or have difficulties with verbal communication.  Tracy and Larry exemplify all that is thought to be “other” and yet, when they type, they are eloquent, often hilarious, articulate and philosophical, as well as insightful about society’s view of them.  After watching Wretches and Jabberers, one cannot help but conclude we are all more alike than not.  The divisions we perceive are shown as constructs of our own making.  The biases we have towards those with disabilities is something we all must actively change.

A few months ago Tracy Thresher generously agreed to answer a few of my questions.  What follows is our conversation, but as you read this, please think about questions you may have and leave them for me in the comments section or email me privately with them at:  emmashopeblog@gmail.com.  (Do tell me whether you prefer to remain anonymous as I will credit you with any questions I end up using, unless you prefer I do not.)  I intend to submit this interview, once it’s finished, to Huffington Post and hope it might inspire people to reconsider their assumptions.

AZ:  Tracy, how would you describe the documentary, Wretches and Jabberers?

TT:  Our film catapulted me to realize my dream of traveling the world to educate, learn and change old attitudes of discrimination toward people of varying abilities. The Larry and Tracy duo illustrates how intelligence is often worked out in a much different way. Our journey takes us to places of enlightenment and our humanity, humor and intelligence comes shining through our typing. Our mission to spread the reality of our amazing intelligence through our typing is our way of promoting the Presumption of Competence dispelling myths. Our story is one that is a road trip for two friends who are in Larry’s words “more like you than not”.

AZ:  “More like you than not” is such a wonderful description.  So much of the literature surrounding autism is about the “deficits” of Autistic neurology compared to non Autistic neurology. Can you talk about the assets and the similarities?

TT:  In my way of thinking, my experience initially was uncontrollable anger for the life I had trying to break through the misunderstanding in school. Kids can be brutally honest, reflecting the language that was the accepted norm in my childhood. Labeling kids is crippling. MR (mental retardation) on a diagnostic chart equates to NOT a candidate for the honor roll. Now I am able to communicate the reality of autism. I met Monk Hogen during the filming of “Wretches and Jabberers”, shining his wisdom on my autism. My true desire and purpose in life is breaking the walls of injustice down and my autism is the gift God gave me. I now focus on how I am connecting with all kinds of people through my work on the road. The high I feel in my own community is so wonderful, knowing that people want to know me. The man I am today is because my autism is the gift I was given to be a leader to anyone who has ever felt less than human based on their appearance. Martin Luther King knew that hurt and he took it to the mountain of peace. My mind is more like a Mensa candidate than I can type. My life is a testimony to the lesson of humanity. Like Larry typed “More like you than not” is the guiding principle to inclusion.

The anger on stage during my presentation in Japan was related to the lost opportunities in my education. I kept shouting out my automatics like “Look at me now! The kid you told one another to keep in isolation now is mentoring students which is healing salve to old wounds of injustice.” The other anger in Sri Lanka is more about the heat in the way it took my overly heated mix of perspiration soaking my clothing to extreme discomfort. Also, the popular foods in their culture are not in my comfort zone. Finland washed my anger, turning my heart to love of the climate. The cuisine helped too. Primarily, beautiful lands of countryside put my spirit at ease. Henna melted years of lost hope by crumbling away the feelings of isolating my heart to love.

People in the world often fear the paradox that autism usually presents. Larry and I mostly felt gracious vibes in our travels but the camera crew likely alters reality. To reflect on the cultural attitudes, the typing of my international friends is the true compass pointing to injustice.

AZ:  For children who may be trying to cope with similar frustrations and anger, what do you suggest to them and their parents, teachers and therapists?

TT:  This is my mission to show kids and their supports that putting communication to the top of their list of priorities is vitally cleansing to the mind. Releasing deep thoughts is the key to alleviating anxiety. Frustration leads the body to unproductive anger. Being able to show intelligent thought is the path to happier futures and true quality of life, leading to purpose. That is what I sought and found with typing.

AZ:  Was there anything others might have done to help you when you were overwhelmed with anger?

Harvey and I have trust in our partnership. I need his firm yet kind support to stay on course with managing my autism. Harvey and I work well together. Typing is my outlet and open communication is the key.  Long term shared goals helps to keep me on track. Harvey’s commitment to my communication is the big time dosing of calm energy that I need. The commitment to presuming competence is the major breeze of refreshing air to cooling anger.

AZ:  You communicate by typing, but need someone to support your typing.  Why is it necessary for you to have someone supporting you?

TT:  Impulse to type out my most irritating automatics like going to radio stations or wcax news gets looping in my mind. Having good facilitators is helping me to slow my typing to think and connect to my inner thoughts. I also need high goal of working on fading physical support to be more independent and type with lessening support. Building trust is critical to fading.

Tracy Thresher

12 responses to “An Interview With Tracy Thresher of Wretches and Jabberers

  1. “More like you than not” Love that! I think that’s true for everyone who is visibly different.

  2. Susan Thresher

    I understand exactly what Tracy has gone through all his life as we watched him grow up. It was difficult for Tracy and his family to try and understand just what autism was and how we could help him. We a are proud of his accomplishments, he has worked hard to become the person he is today. He is devoting his life to helping others in mentoring students and family’s to prove that there is a light at the end of the tunnel where many have thought there is not hope for communication. He is living proof of that. I say all this as we are his family.. his mom, Susan Thresher, his dad Hilton Thresher, and his brother Jeff Thresher. God Bless you Tracy, we love you!!!

  3. Unstrange Mind

    Is Tracy still homeless? That was so angering to me, watching the film and seeing this brilliant, articulate man who consults with politicians and travels the world and presents in front of audiences and adds so much good to the world yet we (society) are not taking care of him on the most fundamental level of having a safe and comfortable place to live! Has his situation improved since the film?

  4. Hi Tracy, this is Sunny. CJ is typing this for me.
    I’d just like to say, this article was very inspiring to me. Thank you Tracy and Ariane for doing this interview.
    We still want to join forces with you in advocacy.
    Sunny

  5. Thank you, i have 3 austistic children 7, 4 and 2 and one is non verbal who we are doing everything we can to enhance his ability to communicate. Your story inspires me as his dad to continue to do everything we can. Thank you.

  6. The movie left such an imprint in my heart. When I saw Tracy and Larry, I was literally awestruck with how unassuming they were at the 2012 Autcom. This is a very nice interview Ariane, thank you.

  7. Thanks Ariane for this opportunity. Because of your movie, Tracey, we are planning on bringing our 22 year old son up to the conference in Syracuse in July. Since Andre is nonverbal and has only had a very limited communication system we have no idea how he will feel about trying FC and being at the conference. Could you tell us how you were first introduced to FC and how did you feel about it in the beginning? Thank you. Maren

    • Maren, please come over and say hello if you see us at the conference. We will be there. I am presenting on writing and blogging, along with Ibby and Amy Sequenzia.
      I will send your terrific questions to Tracy.
      Thanks so much for commenting!

  8. “My life is a testimony to the lesson of humanity.”

    “The man I am today is because my autism is the gift I was given to be a leader to anyone who has ever felt less than human based on their appearance.”

    “Finland washed my anger.”
    “This is my mission to show kids and their supports that putting communication to the top of their list of priorities is vitally cleansing to the mind. Releasing deep thoughts is the key to alleviating anxiety. Frustration leads the body to unproductive anger. Being able to show intelligent thought is the path to happier futures and true quality of life, leading to purpose. That is what I sought and found with typing.”
    “The commitment to presuming competence is the major breeze of refreshing air to cooling anger.”

    Tracy, I have no words that can match the beauty of yours. I can offer only two but they come from the bottom of my heart:

    Thank you.

    And thank you, Ariane, as always.

  9. Does Tracy have a blog of his own? I have an 18 year old son that just graduated from high school and is non verbal. He took regular ed classes throughout high school and is working hard at being a self advocate for what he wants. Are Tracy and Larry going to be speaker anywhere close to the Midwest this year.

    I just watched their documentary for the third time and it touches my heart every time.

    Julie

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s